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A solarium with the help of an expert hand

Well-known companies like Novasol, Zytco, or Servitech have designed over the years models that are more respectful of the initial architecture of the houses. We no longer only offer simple square boxes ready to assemble, but we also now offer style, especially with models with Georgian, Victorian or Edwardian gables. However, owners who like high-end contemporary art will have the good idea to turn to an architect who designs to measure.

The architect Jean-Claude Boisvert is not in his infancy when it comes to bringing light into an existing house. “I will always design a house based on the potential of the land. For me, this is fundamental. The solarium is a transition space between house and garden. We are aware of the sunshine, the good and bad weather and the changes in season. ”

The solarium on rue Montpellier in Saint-Laurent, he designed it as a pergola in continuity with the garden. The wood that fills the space inside extends into the sky in front of the immense conifers. We chose Colombian pine as an interior and exterior coating. Despite requests from the City, which insisted on exterior brickwork, the architect stood firm. “We couldn’t put brick because we were on screw piles,” said Boisvert.

Because it apparently takes courage, faced with the regulations of boroughs and cities as soon as we get off the beaten track … and known models. Each time, with each new project, says Mr. Boisvert, everything has to be started all over again. The new town planning regulations prevent aberrations, but they also slow down architectural innovations. “During this time, they let the old three-season solariums spoil the landscape,” denounces the architect.

Materials: aluminum, PVC or wood

The three most common materials used in the manufacture of solariums – machined or custom-made – are PVC, aluminum and wood. PVC requires little maintenance and provides good insulation. Aluminum is more resistant than PVC – therefore more expensive – but offers less good insulation. Wood remains the benchmark since it goes well with all styles, but it is significantly more expensive and requires good maintenance. In the Victorian and Edwardian style solariums, attractive decorative ridges adorn the roof, whether of metal, treated wood or plastic.

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